Can More Than One SSD Be Put In The Same Motherboard?

Nowadays, computers have a new generation storage device known as a solid-state drive (SSD). Hard disks are replaced by SSDs, which are significantly faster. Older hard-disk often makes the computer run slow because of the storage technologies. SSDs increase the speed of computers due to their fast throughputs and low read-access times.

What is a solid-state drive?

Data was stored on mechanical hard drives, for decades. These hard disk drives (HDDs) are mainly based on moving parts, like a write/read head that goes back and forth, to sum up data. This makes HDDs the suitable computer hardware component to cease to function.

NAND is a simple memory chip used in SSD. Flash memory, which has no near-instant access times and moving parts.

In the 1970s and 1980s, SSD was used in high-end supercomputers, and this technology started in the early 1950s. The storage capacity of this technology was small (2MB-20MBs) compared to the prices. Before the 1990s, the SSD technology was used only by aerospace sectors and in the military.

In the early 1990s, hard disk innovations caused SSD prices to lower down. However, the size and lifespan were still an issue: An SSD had only roughly 10 years of lifespan. The SSD’s controller has the exact address of the block, so when you’re PC requests a file, it is (almost) immediately available. No need to wait for the read/write head to find the information you need. Therefore, the SSD access time is measured in nanoseconds.

What are solid-state drives used for?

SSD is accepted where there is high and quick performance. Below are areas where SSD is recommended.

SSDs have specific benefits in the following areas:

  • Business: Companies working with huge amounts of data (such as programming environments or data analysis) often rely on SSDs, as access times and file-transfer speeds are critical.
  • Gaming: Gaming requires expensive technology for the benefit of gaming performance. That is particularly true for storage, as modern blockbuster games constantly load and write files.
  • Mobility: SSDs have low power consumption, thus contributing to better battery life in laptops and tablets. SSDs are also shock resistant, which reduces the chances of loss of data.
  • Servers: Enterprise servers need SSDs to get fast data accumulation and transfers to properly serve their client PCs.

What are the different types of SSDs?

Specific interfaces are required to attach to your system. Common interfaces are:

·         PCIe and NVMe SSDsPCI Express (PCIe) is normally used to connect graphics cards, network cards, or other high-performance peripherals. This interface gives you high bandwidth and low latency when you need fast communication between the SSD and your CPU/RAM. SSDs that use this connection type are based on the Nonvolatile Memory Express standard (NVMe), which offers higher input-output per second (IOPS) and even lower potential than SATA (which we’ll get to in a moment). ·         NVMe has a raw throughput of up to 16 GBits per second, thanks to multiple parallel channels, which run at speeds of up to 4,000 MB per second.

  • MSATA III, SATA III, and all traditional SSDs: Serial Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA) is an older interface designed specifically for storage, with speeds up to 6 GBit/s or about 600 MB per second. NVME, which is significantly faster than SATA. Older PCs or laptops with a hard disk drive would still benefit from an upgrade to a SATA-based SSD.

During the short-lived era of netbooks, the famous Asus Eee PC series used 1-4 GB of SSDs as storage, from which parts of the operating system were run for faster access. This was the first mainstream use of SSDs. From then on, ultrabooks and eventually desktop PCs started to adopt SSDs. Today, common sizes are between 250 GB and 500 GB, which is plenty of space to hold your Windows operating system, the most common programs, and a lot of your files.

A History of HDDs and SSDs

Hard disk technology is relatively old (in any case, from the perspective of computer history). The IBM 650 RAMAC hard dr1956 is well known, and it uses 50 24-inch wide discs to hold a huge 3.75MB storage space. Of course, this is the size of an average 128Kbps MP3 file today, which is stored in a physical space that can accommodate two commercial refrigerators. RAMAC 350 was limited to government and industrial use and was obsolete by 1969. How far have we gone!

The form factor of PC hard drives was standardized to 5.25 inches in the early 1980s, and soon after that, the familiar 3.5-inch desktop and 2.5-inch notebook-class drives were introduced. Over the years, the internal cable interface has changed from serial to IDE (now often called Parallel ATA or PATA) and then from SCSI to Serial ATA (SATA). However, each component serves the same purpose: connect the hard drive to the PC’s motherboard so that your data can shuttle back and forth.

Today’s 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch drives mainly use the SATA interface (at least on most PCs and Macs), although many high-speed internal SSDs now use the faster PCI Express interface. Capacity has grown from several megabytes to several gigabytes, an increase of more than one million times. Currently, the capacity of available 3.5-inch hard drives exceeds 10TB.

In the late 2000s, when netbooks emerged, the first main drive we called SSD began to appear. In 2007, OLPC XO-1 used 1GB SSD, while the Asus Eee PC 700 series used 2GB SSD as the main storage. The SSD chips on these laptops are permanently soldered to the motherboard.

As netbooks and other ultra-portable notebook computers become more powerful, SSD capacity has also increased, and finally standardized in the size of 2.5-inch notebook computers. In this way, you can eject the 2.5-inch hard drive from your laptop or desktop and then easily replace it with an SSD, and the manufacturer can design only one drive bay.

Advantages and Disadvantages of SSDs and HDDs

SSD is the latest technology used in Apple MacBook Pro and other latest laptops. However, a hard disk is still cheaper and affordable, which does not offer a hard drive even as a configurable option. At least for the next 5 years, a desktop computer will continue to offer HDDs. Both the SSDs and hard drives do the same job: They boot your system and store your applications and personal files. But each type of storage has its unique characteristics.

Pricing SSD vs. HDD

Hard drives are cheaper than SSDs in terms of dollars per gigabytes. The cheapest SSD with a capacity of 1TB internal 2.5-inch start at around $100, and a hard drive of the same capacity costs between $40 and $60

Maximum and Common Capacities SSD vs. HDD

It is expensive for Consumer SSDs to find in capacities greater than 2TB. 500GB to 1 TB units will be available in the primary drive system. A base hard drive capacity is 500GB for premium laptops these days; it can be pushed down to 128GB or 256GB for lower-priced SSD-based systems. Cloud-based storage may be good for housing files you plan to share among your PC, tablet, and smartphone, but local storage is less expensive, and you have to buy it only once, not subscribe to it.

Speed SSD vs. HDD

PC having SSD in it will boot in far less than a minute, often in just seconds. A hard drive needs time to speed up to operating specs, and it will pursue to be steady than an SSD during normal use. A MAC or PC with SSD boots faster, launches and runs apps faster, and transfers files faster. Whether you’re using your computer for business, school, or fun, the extra speed may be the difference between finishing on time and being late.

Reliability and Durability SSD vs. HDD

An SSD has no moving parts, so it is more likely to keep your data safe if you drop your laptop bag or your system gets shaken while it’s operating. Form Factors SSD vs. HDD

Hard drives have a limit to how small they can be manufactured. Many initiatives have been done to make hard drives more compatible, but that stalled at 320 GB.SSD has no such limitation, and these drives come in 42mm,60mm, 80mm, and 120mm lengths.

Form Factors SSD vs. HDD

Hard drives have a limit to how small they can be manufactured. Many initiatives have been done to make hard drives more compatible. SSD has no such limitation, and these drives come in 42mm, 60mm, 80mm, and 120mm/lengths

Noise, Power, and Lifespan SSD vs. HDD

Every hard-disk will produce a bit of noise. Faster the hard-disk or more powerful it will emit more noise when it’s in use (The drive platters spin and the read arm ticks back and forth), while SSD makes no noise as they are non-mechanical

SSD safe energy as energy consumed by SSD is not wasted in friction or noise, which will lead to lower energy consumption, which will lead to more battery hours.

SSD vs. HDD Storage: Breaking It Out by User

Speed, ruggedness, form factor, noise, or fragmentation (technically, a subset of speed) are important factors to you, and SSD is recommended in these cases. SSD would be the market leader in price, and storage was not an issue. Enthusiast multimedia users and heavy downloaders: Video collectors need space, and on the hard drive, you can get space more than 8TB.

Budget buyers: SSD is more expensive as compared to the hard drive.

Graphic arts and engineering professionals: Video and photographers or editors require more space, and buying a 2TB hard disk will be cheaper than buying a 500 GB SSD.

General users: SSD will provide a better experience if the workload is not huge and online streaming or small record data-keeping. It will provide a better experience, but people from other fields who have large data storage will have to move to the hard disk as it’s cheaper.

Road warriors: People who put their laptops into their bags in a hurry will want the extra security of an SSD. That laptop may not be fully asleep when you violently shut. This also includes people who work in the field, like utility workers and researchers.

Audio engineers and musicians: SSD will be a better option if you’re recording or mastering music; you don’t want the noisy sound from a hard drive.

Hybrid Drives and Dual-Drive Systems

In the mid-2000s, some hard drive manufacturers, Samsung and Seagate, theorized that if you add a few gigabytes of flash chips to a spinning hard drive, you could fashion a so-called “hybrid” drive. This would overcome SSD less storage with a hard drive with a large storage capacity of SSD. The system has the potential for booting and launching your most important apps faster, even though you can’t directly install anything in that space yourself.

Like Voltron, SSD and a hard drive can be combined on systems, like Intel’s Optane memory. Optane Memory acts as an SSD-like cache to help the system more speedily boot and launch programs from the main boot drive. This PC will need space and support for the two drives, a requirement that may exclude some laptops and small-form-factor desktops. You’ll also need your system’s motherboard to support the caching technology.

The Storage of Tomorrow

No one is sure whether SSDs will replace traditional hard drives, especially with shared cloud storage waiting in the wings. The price of SSDs is reducing, but they’re still too expensive to fully replace the terabytes of data that some users have in their PCs and Macs for mass storage that doesn’t need to be fast, just simply there.

Digital Storage Interfaces, Protocols, and Form Factors

Device Interfaces: SATA, SAS, NVMe, and the Memory Channel

Four major interfaces used by hard drives and SSD to communicate with the host system

  1. Serial Advanced technology attachment (SATA),
  2. Serial-attached SCSI (SAS),
  3. NVMe over peripheral component interconnect express (PCIe),
  4. The memory channel.

Serial Advanced technology attachment (SATA)

It is the medium or connector of storage-related between Hard disk/ SSD and motherboard. If you have Pc or laptop, it will consist of serial ATA (SATA) compatible hardware. Whether you use a hard disk, SSD, or optical drive, almost all use SATA.

Digital Storage Interfaces, Protocols, and Form Factors

Device Interfaces: SATA, SAS, NVMe, and the Memory Channel

Hard drives and SSDs use four major interfaces to communicate with the host system:

  1. Serial Advanced technology attachment (SATA),
  2. Serial-attached SCSI (SAS),
  3. NVMe over peripheral component interconnect express (PCIe),
  4. The memory channel.

Serial Advanced technology attachment (SATA)

It is the medium or connector of storage-related between Hard disk/ SSD and motherboard. If you have Pc or laptop, it will consist of serial ATA (SATA) compatible hardware. Whether you use a hard disk, SSD, or optical drive, almost all use SATA.

Will I lose data on SSD if I Upgrade my Motherboard

Any storage device which is not permanently attached to the motherboard can be removed and attached to another motherboard providing appropriate connectors. You have to update the drivers if the new motherboard is different from the old one, as the operating system won’t transfer.

Same as boot disk may not boot if the boot process is different, e.g., If you are running a 32-bit version of Windows 10 on a 64-bit motherboard, the firmware will look for an appropriate 32-bit boot loader file.

Secondly, if SSD contains an incompatible operating system with the motherboard, then there can be an issue. (Taylor, 2019)

More than one SSD in the Same Motherboard

As explained above, SATA. Now you have understood that multiple SSD can function if your motherboard supports and have multiple SATA sockets. If your motherboard also supports RAID storage, you can use SATA instead of SATA HDDs. But there can be a problem or limitation, such as PC motherboards have been giving you a lot of SATA ports, but M.2 slots are much less, and the issue is physical board space than SATA do. Apart from this, M.2 drives more PCIe lanes than SATA ports.M.2 at least need two lanes.

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